Trademarks – How Long It takes to Get a Mark Registered

The first step up registering a new trademark is to conduct a search to make sure the chosen mark is free to help you. A search can normally be completed within a week. However, in urgent cases a search can be done within 24 hours, although there become extra costs to do this.

If the search is clear, the next task is for an application to be filed to register your trademark. This can usually be done by a trademark lawyer as soon as your instructions are received. The application will then need to be examined by established track record authorities. This examination process can take several weeks or months, depending across the country and around the nature of the potential. Once the examination has been completed, assuming that no objections have been raised, or any objections overcome, your own trademark will need to be published for opposition purposes. A trademark application normally remains open to opposition for a time period two or 3 months depending on the region. If no oppositions are encountered, any trademark will there will be registration. In some countries there are usually further registration fees to pay, in the course of other countries just like US it can be necessary to provide specimens to show the mark is being used.

The whole process of obtaining a UK Trademark Reply Filing Online India registration typically take about 5-6 months, assuming that no serious problems are encountered.

For European (CTM) applications the process is slower and the time involved could differ considerably. Applications that encounter objections or oppositions should be registered within november 17 years, although sometimes it can be less than this.

If there are official objections, or oppositions from third parties, then the whole can take for a longer time. Importantly, protection will date back towards filing date of one’s application and those who have been using your mark illegally since that date will have been infringing your rights and end up being liable to you in damages.